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Transportation and Communication - Post Offices
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Ref Number
R-A2456
Item Date
1897


"Opened in 1885, the Boscurvis post office was typical of early settlement times when someone's farm also served as the post office."


As homesteaders moved to the prairies to begin a new life it was essential for them to communicate with family members back home. Letter writing was the only means of accomplishing this until the telegraph and telephone became common place. Post offices were established in most rural areas and the mail reached every corner of the province.

Document Details
Reference Number:
R-A2456
Media Type:
photograph
Keywords:
Clothing and Dress; sod Houses; Post Service


Sort Results:
Preview Ref Number Type Title
Image Preview R-A2456 Photograph 01 - "Opened in 1885, the Boscurvis post office was typical of early settlement times when someone's farm also served as the
Image Preview R-B11811 Photograph 02 - "Some of the early post offices were very rustic. This one near Druid was used alternately as a post office, rest house
Image Preview R-B1773 Photograph 03 - A buckboard and team in front of the Strathcarrol post office.
Image Preview R-A21424 Photograph 04 - Craven's post office was located in a small shed beside a log house.
Image Preview S-B1429 Photograph 05 - At the Cressman post office near Guernsey.
Image Preview R-A9120 Photograph 06 - The postmistress’ home was also the local post office.
Image Preview R-A12449 Photograph 07 - The community of Tyvan had a regular postal wicket.
Image Preview R-A162 Photograph 08 - "In larger communities such as Humboldt, the post office was a more imposing structure."
Image Preview R-A9370-2 Photograph 09 - In Estevan the post office was also the customs building.
Image Preview R-B327 Photograph 10 - The Scarth street post office in Regina.
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