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Pre 1870 - Introduction
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Ref Number
R-A3955
Item Date
no date


A Métis camp on the prairie.


Prior to 1870 the future province of Saskatchewan was populated by Aboriginal peoples such as Cree, Blackfoot, and Assiniboine, as well as Métis hunters and carters, and a few European fur traders. From the European perspective the land was owned by the Hudson’s Bay Company. The Company had established a network of fur trading posts and trading routes across the land starting with Cumberland House in 1774. While the fur trade affected the Aboriginal peoples, they along with the Métis continued to live on the open plains pretty much as they had for generations. The few Europeans who lived in the area, that later became Saskatchewan, were mainly located along the rivers and living in fur trading posts. Agricultural settlement did not yet exist on any large scale due in part to John Palliser’s expedition between 1857 and 1858, when he reported that much of the prairies were unsuitable to settlement.

Document Details
Reference Number:
R-A3955
Media Type:
photograph
Keywords:
Red River Carts


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Image Preview R-A3955 Photograph 1 - A Métis camp on the prairie.
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